This ‘japa’ syndrome is adversely affecting services in our hospitals


This ?japa? syndrome is adversely affecting services in our hospitals -  Minister of State for Health, Ekumankama Nkama

Minister of State for Health, Ekumankama Nkama has said that increased migration witnessed across the country has led to shortage of doctors, nurses and other health professionals in government hospitals across all levels (local, state and federal). 

 

Speaking at the inauguration of bedded Intensive Care Unit, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, and Labour ward at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Nkama disclosed that the Ministry of Health is working on a brain gain mechanism whereby Nigerian-born health professionals in the diaspora can be incentivised to come home and give paid expert service to citizens. 

 

The Minister who was repsented at the event by the Director, National Cancer Control Programme of the ministry, Dr David Atuwo, said; 

 

“This ‘japa’ syndrome is adversely affecting services in our hospitals, to the extent that some wards are closed for lack of personnel to man them.

“The ministry is also working on a brain gain mechanism whereby our health professionals in the diaspora can be incentivised to come home and give paid expert service to our citizens. This is a win, win situation for the nation and our experienced medical professionals in the diaspora.”

“I am glad the Head of Service is here in person as her office has been very cooperative. Let me thank her profusely for all her efforts in this regard. The full implementation of this initiative will ensure that services are maintained at the present level.”



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